Summer History Programs Feature 'Cures' of Homosexuality, Queer Sex and Technology, Ballot Initiatives on Gay Rights

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 28, 2012

San Francisco -- The GLBT History Museum will present two author talks and a "Making History Now" panel discussion in July and August. All of the events take place at the museum at 4127 18th St. in the city's Castro District. Admission is $5.00 (suggested donation). For more information, call (415) 621-1107 or visit www.glbthistory.org.

Author Talk: Jesse Bering
Stubbornly Queer: Sexual Reorientation Attempts Through the Lens of History
Tuesday, July 17
7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Ever since the 1886 publication of Richard von Krafft-Ebing's Psychopathia Sexualis and the medical identification of the 'condition' known as homosexuality, physicians, psychiatrists and psychologists have attempted to eliminate homosexual arousal in gay men and lesbians while simultaneously inducing heterosexual attraction. Jesse Bering, research psychologist, author of the new book Why Is the Penis Shaped Like That? (Farrar, Strauss & Giroux) and blogger for Scientific American, will survey the painful history of supposed cures of homosexuality through psychoanalytical, behavioral and endocrinological interventions. Offering a preview of Bering his next book project, Bering also will look at the real motivations behind these endless conversion attempts and, ultimately, at the question of whether any of them actually worked. For more information on Bering and his work, visit www.jessebering.com.

Panel Discussion
Queer Sex and Technology: Hooking Up From the 1940s to the Present
Thursday, July 26
7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

From phone numbers on bathroom walls to posts on Facebook walls, GLBT people have found creative ways to use technology to facilitate hooking up, whether for an hour or a lifetime. This intergenerational conversation about the devices and tactics queer men and women have used to find sexual and romantic connections is the first installment in The GLBT History Museum's new Making History Now series. The panel will feature historian Martin Meeker, author of Contacts Desired: Gay and Lesbian Community and Communications, 1940s-1970s (University of Chicago Press); queer theorist Juana Maria Rodriguez, associate professor of gender and women's studies at the University of California, Berkeley, and author of Queer Latinidad: Identity Practices, Discursive Spaces (New York University Press); and blogger Oscar Raymundo (Queerty and www.GayCities.com).

Author Talk: Amy Stone
Gay Rights at the Ballot Box: Voting on GLBT Issues From 1974 to Today
Thursday, August 2
7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

The first antigay ballot measure in the United States was a referendum in Boulder, Colo., in 1974 to repeal a recently passed gay rights ordinance. Since then, the GLBT community has faced more than 150 referendums and initiatives across the country. From Anita Bryant to Oregon's Ballot Measure 9 to California's Proposition 8, everything from local nondiscrimination laws to same-sex marriage rights have been put before the voters, largely by the religious right. In this talk, Amy L. Stone, author of the new book Gay Rights at the Ballot Box (University of Minnesota Press) and an assistant professor at Trinity University in San Antonio, will provide a historical account of the ways the GLBT movement has fought back, organized and grown in response to these ballot measures. For more information on Stone and her book, visit www.upress.umn.edu/book-division/books/gay-rights-at-the-ballot-box.

ABOUT THE GLBT HISTORY MUSEUM

The GLBT History Museum is the first full-scale, stand-alone museum of its kind in the United States. Currently featured are two major exhibitions: "Our Vast Queer Past: Celebrating San Francisco's GLBT History" and "Life and Death in Black and White: AIDS Direct Action in San Francisco, 1985-1990," plus a special temporary display, "The Birth of the Rainbow Flag." The museum is a project of the GLBT Historical Society, a research center and archives founded in 1985 that houses one of the world's largest collections of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender historical materials. For more information, visit www.glbthistory.org.

'A Momentous Year in GLBT History': Museum Program Recalls 1978 and Birth of Rainbow Flag in San Francisco

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June 4, 2012

San Francisco -- The GLBT History Museum has announced an added program for its June Pride Month series. A "living history talk" will present Gilbert Baker, designer of the rainbow flag, an internationally recognized symbol of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender pride, in conversation with longtime activist Cleve Jones. The event is set for Tuesday, June 19, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m., at the museum, located at 4127 18th St. in the city's Castro District.

Baker created the rainbow flag for the Pride Parade in San Francisco in 1978 -- a momentous year in GLBT history that included the inauguration of Harvey Milk as a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, the defeat of the antigay Briggs Initiative and Milk's assassination after just 11 months in office. In the subsequent three decades, the flag has come to be recognized worldwide as an emblem of GLBT community. Baker joins his friend Cleve Jones, who served as an intern in Milk's office and who later founded the Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt, in recalling the birth of the rainbow flag and the tumultuous events of 1978.

Admission is $5.00 (suggested donation). For more information and for the full calendar of June programs at the museum, visit www.glbthistory.org.

ABOUT THE GLBT HISTORY MUSEUM

The GLBT History Museum is the first full-scale, stand-alone museum of its kind in the United States. Currently featured are two major exhibitions: "Our Vast Queer Past: Celebrating San Francisco's GLBT History" and "Life and Death in Black and White: AIDS Direct Action in San Francisco, 1985-1990." The museum is a project of the GLBT Historical Society, a research center and archives founded in 1985 that houses one of the world's largest collections of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender historical materials.

May Programs at GLBT History Museum Feature Authors of New Queer Biography, Lesbian Memoir

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April 16, 2012

San Francisco -- Two programs in May will feature authors of new books that detail stories of queer lives through biography and memoir. The authors, Amy Sueyoshi and Chana Wilson, will sign their books following readings and discussion; copies will be available for purchase. The two evening events take place at The GLBT History Museum at 4127 18th St. in San Francisco's Castro District. Admission is $5.00 (donation). For more information, call (415) 621-1107 or visit www.glbthistory.org.

Queer Compulsions: Race, Nation and Sexuality in the Affairs of Yone Noguchi
Wednesday, May 2
7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Amy Sueyoshi presents her new book tracing the astonishing life of Japanese writer Yone Noguchi (1875-1947), who carried on an affair with San Francisco novelist Charles Warren Stoddard at the same time that he was fathering a child with an American woman and promising marriage to another woman in Japan and two in the United States. Published by the University of Hawaii Press, Queer Compulsions: Race, Nation and Sexuality in the Affairs of Yone Noguchi came out at the end of March.

As the publisher notes, "Noguchi's intimacies point to little-known realities of race and sexuality in turn-of-the-century America and illuminate how Asian immigrants negotiated America's literary and arts community. As Noguchi maneuvered through cultural and linguistic differences, his affairs ... assert how Japanese in America could forge romantic fulfillment during a period historians describe as one of extreme sexual deprivation and discrimination for Asians, particularly in California."

Sueyoshi is an associate professor of race and resistance studies and sexuality studies at San Francisco State University and is co-curator of "Our Vast Queer Past," the current exhibition in the main gallery of The GLBT History Museum.

Riding Fury Home: A Memoir by Chana Wilson
Tuesday, May 8
7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

Chana Wilson discusses and reads from Riding Fury Home, her memoir of her lesbian mother, the persecution her mother faced in the 1950s and 1960s, and her own and her mother's coming out in the 1970s. The book was released in April by Seal Press, a publisher of books by and for women that is based in Berkeley, Calif.

According to the publisher, "In 1958, when Chana Wilson was seven, her mother held a rifle to her own head and pulled the trigger. The gun jammed and she was taken away to a mental hospital. It would be many years before [Chana] learned the secret of her mother's anguish: her love affair with another married woman, and the psychiatric treatment aimed at curing her of her lesbianism. Riding Fury Home spans 40 years of the intense, complex relationship between Chana and her mother -- the trauma of their early years together, the transformation and joy they found when they both came out in the 1970s."

Wilson is a psychotherapist and a former radio producer and television engineer. She lives with her wife in Oakland, Calif.

GLBT History Museum Sponsors Program, Exhibit on 1991 Queer Riot in San Francisco

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September 14, 2011

San Francisco -- At the height of the AIDS crisis and in the midst of a wave of queer militancy in the early 1990s, California Governor Pete Wilson vetoed AB101, a statewide gay and lesbian rights bill. San Francisco's GLBT community responded with outrage: Thousands joined a massive protest on Sept. 30, 1991, that ended with the police in retreat and a state office building in flames.

Known as the AB101 Veto Riot, the clash was the most recent of the three queer riots that have taken place in the history of the city, following the Compton's Cafeteria Riot of 1966 and the White Night Riot of 1979. To mark the 20th anniversary of the 1991 riot, the GLBT History Museum in San Francisco's Castro District will feature a special program and a small exhibit this month:


PROGRAM

"All the Rage: Stories From the AB101 Veto Riot" is set for Thursday, Sept. 29, 7-9 p.m. Moderated by veteran activist Laura Thomas, the program will feature a new documentary short about the riot, as well as a living-history panel with Lito Sandoval and Ingrid Nelson offering inside stories about organizing the veto protest and eyewitness accounts of the uprising in the streets.

Also taking part will be contemporary composer Bob Ostertag, whose piece "All the Rage" for the Kronos Quartet includes sound recorded at the riot, and filmmaker Steve Elkins, director of the short about the riot and of a new feature-length documentary, "The Reach of Resonance," which discusses Ostertag's work.

Admission to the event is $5.00 for the general public; free for members.


EXHIBIT

In conjunction with the program, The GLBT History Museum will be showing "No Apologies, No Regrets: The AB101 Veto Riot" - a single case of historic artifacts and documents drawn from the archives of the GLBT Historical Society. Included is the shoe lost by mayoral candidate Frank Jordan when he was chased from the scene of the Castro District protest that preceded the riot. Also included is a fragment of stained glass from the shattered windows at the entrance of the Old State Building.

The exhibit will be on display Sept. 16 through Oct. 15. during regular museum hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., and Sunday-Monday, noon-5 p.m. Admission to the museum is $5.00 (general); $3.00 (with California student ID); free for members.


The GLBT History Museum is located at 4127 18th St. (near Castro Street) in San Francisco. For more information, visit www.glbthistory.org or call (415) 621-1107.


ABOUT THE GLBT HISTORY MUSEUM

The GLBT History Museum opened in January 2011 as the first full-scale, stand-alone museum of its kind in the United States. Currently featured are two major exhibitions: "Our Vast Queer Past: Celebrating San Francisco's GLBT History" and "Great Collections of the GLBT Historical Society Archives." The museum is a project of the GLBT Historical Society, a research center and archives founded in 1985 that houses one of the world's largest collections of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender historical materials.